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Old 17/02/2010, 09:52 PM   #19
SMX
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Default Re: PC Questions Thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by iTailsTheStunter
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Q: What is the difference in DDR, DDR2, and DDR3?
A: DDR refers to the series of pins. DDR only has about 184-pins I believe. DDR2 and DDR3 both have 240-pin slots. Now, the complete difference in all of them, is the clock rate and latency. For example, a DDR2 stick of 800MHz, will run faster than a 667MHz DDR2 stick. You will also want to look for latency. 5-5-5-15 is the norm for gaming RAM in DDR2. DDR3 is able to run higher clock rates with more latency. (ie, DDR3 1336MHz 8-8-8-24)
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You forgot to mention: for latency, lower is better and the norm for proper DDR2 gaming memory is 4-4-4-12.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iTailsTheStunter
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Q: Do CPU clock rates count for anything?
A: Yes and no. CPU clock rates don't mean anything unless you have a sufficient amount of wattage going to the CPU. Let's say that I want to run an Intel Core 2 Duo, and it is 2.4GHz. The standard wattage for a CPU is about 95w, 45w at the least. Without sufficient power running through the CPU to keep up with your clock rate, your PC will lag. If you are using too much wattage through your CPU, you could blow it. This is why keeping up with wattage in overclocking is important.
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Not true, your PC will not lag if the CPU does not get enough power, it will just be very unstable depending on how much power it is lacking, it might not even boot or just crash all the time when it needs to do something that stresses the CPU a bit.
It also puts a lot of stress on the power supply unit so that might die prematurely.

If your PC crashes a lot (hard crashes in this case, blue screens or sudden reboots) you might want to check if your PSU supplies enough power, to do this you can check the voltages in the BIOS and match them against how they are supposed to be, 12v should be around 12v, 5v should be around 5v and 3.3v should match aswell.
If they are more than 10 to 20% less than what they are supposed to be you might want to consider getting a PSU with a higher output, take note that when you are looking at those stats in the BIOS your PC is doing pretty much nothing so when it is under load it would be even worse.

Quote:
Originally Posted by iTailsTheStunter
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Q: What is bottlenecking?
A: Bottlenecking is when your PC gets stress on certain areas of hardware. For example, I am running a 300w power supply, and all my hardware requires AT LEAST a 600w power supply. Bottlenecking usually happens when your power input is less than your power output.
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This does not make sense at all.
I would guess you are referring to a bottleneck that stops a game from running faster on your PC.
Well unless you have something software based limiting the game's speed (framerate limiter or VSinc) something will always be bottlenecking it, your PSU however has nothing to do with that.
It can be your CPU, system memory, GPU, the GPU's memory, the PCI-X bus (AGP if you still have that) or some other things I might have missed and if it limits it to 5 or 200 FPS or perhaps more depends on the game/application and your hardware.

Other than that there is some decent information in there.
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